• What other Government Departments or Agencies are involved in the regulation of chemicals in Ireland?

    There are a wide range of Government Departments and Agencies involved in the regulation of chemicals in Ireland.

    Section 8 of the Chemicals Act 2008 (as amended by Section 4 of the Chemicals (Amendment) Act 2010) designates the national/competent authorities in the State for a number of EU Regulations, as follows:

    Rotterdam Regulation

    The Health and Safety Authority is the lead national authority, with clearly defined roles for the Revenue Commissioners, and the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine set out in the Act (as amended).

    Detergents Regulation

    The Health and Safety Authority is the lead competent authority, with clearly defined roles for the Environmental Protection Agency, Beaumont Hospital Board (i.e. the National Poisons Information Centre), and the Irish National Accreditation Board (now a committee of the Health and Safety Authority) set out in the Act (as amended).

    REACH Regulation

    The Health and Safety Authority is the lead competent authority with clearly defined roles for the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, and the Environmental Protection Agency, as set out in the Act (as amended).

    CLP Regulation

    The Health and Safety Authority is the lead competent authority, with clearly defined roles for the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, and Beaumont Hospital Board (i.e. the National Poisons Information Centre), as set out in the Act (as amended).

    In addition, the Safety, Health and Chemicals Policy Unit also liaises with a range of other Government Departments and Agencies on chemicals matters such as: the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment, the Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government, the Department of Justice and Equality, the Department of Health, together with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

    The information above is not intended to be exhaustive in nature. The websites of the various Government Departments and Agencies should be consulted for information on any chemicals responsibilities they may have.

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